Figure Review: Kneesocks by Yamato

Figure Review: Kneesocks by Yamato

Legs are wonderful things. Sometimes they get robbed of their due attention thanks to the buttocks, but physical perfection is impossible without a finely crafted pair of legs. Yamato’s Kneesocks, hailing from Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt, is probably the leggiest figure in my collection right now. But thinking back on it, what would compete? MegaHouse’s Siggy? Max Factory’s Asuka? Nen Nen? They’re all worthy competitors, but none of them beat Kneesocks.

Yamato’s take on Kneesocks follows her anime look (if you’ve time traveled here from the 90s, Panty & Stocking has a more cartoonish aesthetic). They toned down her red skin and went for a more muted shade. Her proportions aren’t outrageous either. I mean, it’s still an idealized female form (except the horn from the forehead), but the proportions aren’t as exaggerated as, say, Duram Sherif. Her bust is a modest size, her waist line is one that a human being might have, and her pose doesn’t portend eminent spinal damage. All of these are good things, as they cut down on the tackiness of the figure.

I like that Yamato emphasized Kneesocks’ sexiness by using her legs. The one bare leg really makes the figure work, drawing attention up to the rest of her body. The fact that her chest is sort of hidden away by her pose makes it more alluring. Finish the package with that devilish smile, and you have a great looking figure. It’s very much like a pin-up, with an anime twist.

Kneesocks was interesting to shoot, as her pose made it difficult to get good angles on her features. I decided to try drawing attention to individual body parts; her bare foot, the left leg, and the small amount of butt cleavage are particularly worth observing. For the first few shots I tried an orange light to emphasize her skin tones. It was an interesting effect for the whole body shots as it seemed to make her skin glow, but for close-ups it became distracting. Also I found that low angle shots work pretty well for Kneesocks as it lets you get better looks at her face and legs.

While this is a beautiful design, a few things bother me about the actual figure. The base is attached via two pegs to her right foot, but the pegs don’t seem to fit all the way. I’ve already had it come loose once while tilting it backward – thankfully I caught it before it hit anything. I’m not entirely convinced, with that pose, that Kneesocks will stay upright indefinitely. But it’s worth noting that after two and a half years of collecting, I’ve never seen a figure begin to lean. The last complaint I have involves her right hand, which holds the scythe. The joint doesn’t hold securely enough to keep the scythe in the right position. A light jostle and the wrist will rotate (thanks to the weight of the scythe). It’s not a huge deal but it’s annoying if you want to get consistent photos. Getting the scythe into the hand itself was a pain. Yamato should have made it separate at the end of the shaft. Instead, you just have to use brute force to get the fingers around the shaft. PVC is resilient and pliable but still… I don’t want to be doing that to my figures on a regular basis.

Yamato’s good at minimizing the fuss with their figures; usually you can unbox and display them with minimal assembly required. Kneesocks is uncharacteristically fussy, not due to an overly elaborate design, but because of some dumb choices in manufacturing. Oh well, it happens sometimes. I still love the look of this figure, and it’s certainly one of the more tasteful ones in my collection. I still have Alter’s version of Kneesocks in the box, and I think it can stay there a bit longer.

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